everybodydigs#62 Oliver Nelson – The Blues and the Abstract Truth

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Oliver Nelson had recorded several sessions for Prestige when the fledgling Impulse! label gave him the opportunity to make this septet date in 1961. The result was a rare marriage between an arranger-composer’s conception and the ideal collection of musicians to execute it. The material is all based somehow on the blues, but Nelson’s structural and harmonic extensions make it highly varied, suggesting ballads, hoedowns, and swing. The band is one of those groupings that seem only to have been possible around 1960, a roster so strong that the leader’s name was actually listed fourth on the cover. Nelson shares the solo space with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, alto saxophonist and flutist Eric Dolphy, and pianist Bill Evans, while bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Roy Haynes contribute support and baritone saxophonist George Barrow adds depth. In stark contrast to Dolphy’s brilliant, convulsive explosions, Nelson’s tenor solos are intriguingly minimalist, emphasizing a tight vibrato and unusual note choices. It’s not quite Kind of Blue (nothing is), but Blues and the Abstract Truth is an essential recording, one that helped define the shape of jazz in the ’60s. –Stuart Broomer

Personnel: Oliver Nelson (tenor/alto saxophone); Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, flute); Geroge Barrow (baritone saxophone); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Paul Chambers (bass); Bill Evans (piano); Roy Haynes (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

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