Ta-ku & Raashan Ahmad – Low Fidelity, High Quality

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Dope stuff from Jakarta Records. Free Download. enjoy.

Raashan Ahmad was on a euro tour some weeks ago and during his stop in Berlin we were talking music over dinner. I told Raashan that we are about to release an album with Ta-ku (which has happened in the meantime, check out the “DOWHATYOULOVE” album) and he asked me whether I knew that he recorded a full album with him some time ago during his last australian tour. No, I didn’t know that and getting my hand on the album turned out to be not too easy as it couldn’t be located for quite a while. In the end Raashan found it on an old hard drive and I was a fan of the album instantly. It’s raw hip hop in the truest sense. None of the songs are longer then 3 minutes, quite some are around the 2 minute mark. Nothing but dope beats and raps with some unreleased Ta-ku instrumentals sprinkled in between.

In celebration of both artists releases on Jakarta Records this year we figured it would be nice to give it away for free digitally and even better we decided that pressing it on wax would be nice too. Only 250 copies, numbered, no repress, the first 80 copies on clear wax.

everybodydigs#126 Dizzy Gillespie – Have Trumpet, Will Excite!

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

It’s easy and perhaps unfair to take any later jazz album by a trendy, “hot” trumpeter and compare it to a classic like Have Trumpet, Will Excite!. Critics and fans have been afforded the luxury of time to weed out half-efforts. Still, even without former knowledge of who Dizzy Gillespie is, Have Trumpet, Will Excite! separates itself from the crowd pretty quickly. The Latin up-tempo arrangement of “My Heart Belongs to Daddy” thrusts the song into an entirely different realm. Junior Mance’s piano kicks things of with a quirky, forceful rhythm, and after Gillespie’s trumpet lays down the bare bones of the melody, it’s pretty much forgotten. From there, the band takes off on a creative surge. The same is true of “My Man.” A brave arrangement, kicked off by piano and outlined by trumpet, completely rewrites the piece. “Sure,” Gillespie and the band, seem to say, “We can play old swing tunes, but wouldn’t it be cool if we turned them inside out?” This approach, along with sharp solos, gives the material an exciting edge. Gillespie’s solo on “St. Louis Blues” just soars, while Les Spann, who plays both flute and guitar on the album, follows him with a bristly guitar solo. Mance offers distinctive piano work that matches Gillespie’s enthusiasm on tunes like “Woody ‘N’ You,” while bassist Sam Jones and drummer Lex Humphries keep a high-octane rhythm in constant motion. Have Trumpet, Will Excite! more than measures up to its promise and stands as a cornerstone of Gillespie’s ’50s work. (allmusic)

Personnel: Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet); Les Spann (flute, guitar); Junior Mance (piano); Sam Jones (bass).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#27

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#27: “Baby, This Love I Have” by Minnie Riperton from “Adventures In Paradise” released in 1975 > sampled in > “Check The Rhime” by A Tribe Called Quest from “The Low End Theory” released in 1991.

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J Sampleecious

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If you follow Rappamelo on Facebook you may have seen “J Sampleecious“, a spotify playlist with songs sampled by J Dilla. It was not easy because Spotify doesn’t have a lot of cool songs sampled by Dilla. Like A Tribe Called Sampleecious and Metal Sampleecious is available to download! Tracklist below and download at the bottom, enjoy!

you can still stream “J Sampleecious” on Spotify.

01. Luther Ingram – To The Other Man (Gobstopper)
02. Dionne Warwick – You’re Gonna Need Me (Stop!)
03. Stevie Wonder – For Once In My Life (The Twister (Huw, What) )
04. The Impressions – We Must Be in Love (Love)
05. Placebo – Humpty Dumpty (Love Jones)
06. Diana Ross and The Supremes – Can’t You See It’s Me (Can’t You See)
07. Ohio Players – Pride and Vanity (Give It Up)
08. Les McCann – Why Is Now (Grannie)
09. Martha Reeves – Sweet Misery (Thunder)
10. The Jackson 5 – All I Do Think Of You (Time: The Donut of the Heart)
11. The Dells – Does Anybody Know I’m Here (Over The Breaks)
12. The Isley Brothers – Footsteps in the Dark (Won’t Do)
13. J.J. Barnes – You Are Just a Living Doll (Believe In God)
14. Gladys Knight & the Pips – Yesterday (Yesterday)
15. Weather Report – Orange Lady (Come Get It)
16. Sylvia Robinson – Sweet Stuff (Crushin’)
17. Dave Grusin – The Colorado Trail (Dreamy)
18. The Escorts – I Can’t Stand (To See You Cry) (Don’t Cry)
19. Eddie Kendricks – My People… Hold On (People)
20. The Isley Brothers – Don’t Say Goodnight (Bye.)

DOWNLOAD!

everybodydigs#125 Roy Ayers – Ubiquity

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Roy Ayers’ leap to the Polydor label inaugurates his music’s evolution away from the more traditional jazz of his earlier Atlantic LPs toward the infectious, funk-inspired fusion that still divides critics and fans even decades after the fact. Although Ubiquity maintains one foot in Ayers’ hard bop origins, the record favors soulful grooves and sun-kissed textures that flirt openly and unapologetically with commercial tastes. Several cuts feature the male/female vocals that would become a hallmark of subsequent Ubiquity efforts, while mid-tempo instrumentals like “Pretty Brown Skin” and “The Painted Desert” feature evocatively cinematic arrangements and intriguing solos that unfurl like psychedelic freak flags. The crack supporting cast including bassist John Williams, keyboardist Harry Whitaker, and drummer Alphonso Mouzon proves equally effective on high-energy numbers like “Can You Dig It” and the Nat Adderley-penned “Hummin’ in the Sun,” which point the way to the mind-expanding funk Ayers would perfect across the sessions to follow. An outstanding record. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#124 Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington ‎- Recording Together For The First Time

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

On April 3, 1961, producer Bob Thiele achieved what should be regarded as one of his greatest accomplishments; he organized and supervised a seven-and-a-half-hour session at RCA Victor’s Studio One on East 24th Street in Manhattan, using a sextet combining Duke Ellington with Louis Armstrong & His All-Stars. The music resulting from Thiele’s inspired experiment is outstanding and utterly essential. That means everybody ought to hear this album at least once, and many will want to hear it again and again all the way through, for this is one of the most intriguing confluences in all of recorded jazz.

sampleecious#26

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#25: “I Wanted It Too” by Robert Flack from “Feel Like Makin’ Love” released in 1975 > sampled in > “That’s Life” by Freddie Joachim from “Midway” released in 2010.

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