everybodydigs#51 Bobby Hutcherson – Components

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Perhaps the single album that best sums up Bobby Hutcherson’s early musical personality, Components is appropriately split into two very distinct halves. The first features four Hutcherson originals in a melodic but still advanced hard bop style, while the latter half has four free-leaning avant-garde pieces by drummer Joe Chambers. Hutcherson allots himself more solo space than on Dialogue, but that’s no knock on the excellent supporting cast, which includes Herbie Hancock on piano, James Spaulding on alto sax and flute, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, and Ron Carter on bass. It’s just more Hutcherson’s date, and he helps unite the disparate halves with a cool-toned control that’s apparent regardless of whether the material is way outside or more conventionally swinging. In the latter case, Hutcherson’s originals are fairly diverse, encompassing rhythmically complex hard bop (the title track), pensive balladry (“Tranquillity,” which features a lovely solo by Hancock), down-and-dirty swing (“West 22nd Street Theme”), and the gaily innocent “Little B’s Poem,” which went on to become one of Hutcherson’s signature tunes and contains some lyrical flute work from Spaulding. The Chambers pieces tend to be deliberate explorations that emphasize texture and group interaction in the manner of Dialogue, except that there’s even more freedom in terms of both structure and tonal center. (The exception is the brief but beautiful closing number, “Pastoral,” an accurate title if ever there was one.) Components illustrated that Hutcherson was not only the most adventurous vibes player on the scene, but that he was also capable of playing more straightforward music with intelligence and feeling. by Steve Huey

Personnel: Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone, marimba); Herbie Hancoc (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); James Spaulding (alto saxophone, flute); Joe Chambers (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#50 Dexter Gordon – Go

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Just before heading off to a 15-year stay in Europe, the stately Dexter Gordon waxed a pair of records for Blue Note in August 1962: this classic and, two days later, A Swingin’ Affair. It’s been widely reported that Gordon himself considered Go! his greatest achievement, and (if so) it’s easy to hear why. Brimming with conviction and poise, Gordon’s gentle-giant sax carries itself with a sort of graceful edge that is difficult to emulate. He’s always quick with a humorous quote, yet it always seems to fit just right. He’s always languishing behind the beat, yet he never seems late. He possesses an enormous tone, yet he never overwhelms the songs or the listener. He sounds unhurried at any speed. His song selection is typically creative, holding little-known ballads close to his brawny chest like a big, cuddly bear. A stellar rhythm section of the elegantly funky pianist Sonny Clark plus Butch Warren and Billy Higgins doesn’t hurt either. –Marc Greilsamer

Personnel: Dexter Gordon (tenor saxophone); Sonny Clark (piano); Butch Warren (bass); Billy Higgins (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#49 George Benson – Bad Benson

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Preceding Breezin’, his crossover smash for Warner in 1976, Bad Benson shows the guitarist still hanging on to his Wes Montgomery roots in places while stretching his soul-jazz persona into even funkier arenas. CTI had a formula for making funky, accessible jazz and fusion records that in 1974 still held true. Arranged by Don Sebesky, Bad Benson is a collection of delicious, varied, and sometimes confusing choices. Benson’s own playing is precise and smooth as always, and guitarist Phil Upchurch keeps a large color palette for him to draw from, as in the funkified version of “Take Five.” Other notables are the stellar “My Latin Brother,” which begins as a Debussy-ian impressionistic string study before becoming a heavily arpeggiated variation on the samba. Kenny Barron’s pianism here is the driving force behind a rhythm section that also includes drummer Steve Gadd and bassist Ron Carter. They give Benson a harmonic floor for one of the most inspiring solos of his career. These intensely meaty cuts — along with Upchurch’s stellar swinging in the pocket groover “Full Compass” — are juxtaposed against ballads such as “Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams” and “The Changing World,” a pair of ballads that ape Montgomery’s later snore-fest session for A&M. Thankfully, Legacy’s remastered CD version includes three bonus tracks from the session: a hip and syncopated read of “Take the ‘A’ Train” (with truly surreal and shimmering colors courtesy of Sebesky’s string section) and the amazingly driving, greasy funk of “Serbian Blue,” as well as a simply beautiful — and brief — solo from Benson called “From Now On.” Not a great album, but a very, very good one. (allmusic)

Personnel: George Benson (guitar); Phil Upchurch (guitar, electric bass, percussion); Alan Shulman, Charles McCracken, Frank Levy, Jesse Levy, Paul Tobias, Seymour Barab (cello); Garnett Brown, Warren Covington, Wayne Andre (trombone); Paul Faulise (trombone bass), Alan Rubin, Joe Shepley, John Frosk (trumpet); Al Regni, George Marge, Phil Bodner, Ray Beckenstein (woodwind); Brooks Tillotson, Jim Buffington (french horn); Steve Gadd (drums); Margaret Ross (harp); Ron Carter (bass); Steve Gadd (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#48 Freddie Hubbard – Blue Spirits

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Freddie Hubbard’s “Blue Spirits” is his unrecognized masterpiece. With a four-horn front line and a surging rhythm section, he crafts brilliant compositions and voices them for maximum impact. Hubbard, James Spaulding, Joe Henderson and Hank Mobley solo with fire and passion. Added to the original album are two tunes from the following year with Henderson and Herbie Hancock.

Personnel: Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); James Spaulding (alto saxophone); Joe Henderson, Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone), Kiane Zawai (euphonium); Hosea Taylor (alto saxophome, bassoon); Bob Cranshaw; Larry Ridley; Reggie Workman (bass); Big Black (congas); Clifford Jarvis, Elvin Jones, Pete La Roca (drums); Harold Mabern, McCoy Tyner (piano); Herbie Hancock (piano).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#47 Franco Micalizzi – La Banda Del Gobbo

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Soundtrack of italian movie “La Banda Del Gobbo” by Franco Micalizzi, one of the most prolific composers of the Italian Cinema. M° Micalizzi became famous around the world for his OST for the cult Western “Lo chiamavano Trinità ” (1970) (available on Digitmovies CDDM026), but also for his other famous OST of “Poliziotteschi” (Police movies) like “Italia a mano armata” (1976), “Roma a mano armata” (1976), “Napoli violenta” (1976), “Il cinico, l’infame e il violento” (1977). For “La banda del gobbo” Franco Micalizzi wrote a sparse, but effective score based on a main theme introduced by the electric piano then developed by moog, brass and percussions in a funky mood (Tr.1). This motif is reprised several times throughout the score, sometimes with slow, another time with fast renditions (Tr.2, Tr.4, Tr.5, Tr.7, Tr.9, Tr.10, Tr.11, Tr.13, Tr.15, Tr.18). Franco Micalizzi also composed suspense music for strings (Tr.8, Tr.16) and various tracks of Source Music like a Sirtaki (Tr.3), a disco music tune (Tr.6), a romantic ballade for voice and orchestra (Tr.12), church music for organ (Tr.14) and funeral music (tr.17). (Beat Records)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#1

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If you have followed Rappamelo before you may already know Sampleecious, essentially a compilation dedicated to samples/sampling or like i used to say: “Just a pack of great songs sampled for other great songs”. Obviously i’m not able to continue with the volumes due to copyright issues but instead of “close” everything I thought to start doing this: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#1: “Kiss of Life” by Sade from “Love Deluxe” released in 1992 > sampled in > “Doomsday” by MF Doom from “Operation Doomsday” released in 1999.

Joe Lovano – Cross Culture

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New album from the legend saxophonist and composer Joe Lovano featuring his critically acclaimed quintet Us Five composed by pianist James Weidman, bassists Esperanza Spalding or Peter Slavov, and drummers Otis Brown III and Francisco Mela with the collaboration of the african guitarist Lionel Loueke. The album is called “Cross Culture” and it’s available now on Blue Note Records, suggested!

you can listen to snippets here, for more info check: www.joelovano.com

Flatpocket – Geldfundphantasyen

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This is “Geldfundphantasyen” from the german beatmakers Twit One and Lazy Jones, the description says: “like Showbiz and AG, Twit One and Lazy Jones like their pockets fat not flat” well… they call their new band Flatpocket and have recorded this concept album based on this topic (“Geldfundphantasyen” means “Finding Money Fantasies” in german), while i would like to have the fat pocket too….. this is a good album, it was released last December both digitally and physically on the german label Melting Pot Music, suggested, enjoy!

For more info check: www.mpmsite.com

Full listen here: