DâM-FunK “Levitate From It All”

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DâM-FunK released his final “Free-Download” before his forthcoming summer 2013 release, stream and download below, enjoy!

‘Levitate from this sh*t. U can do it’.

All music, recording & production by D-F.. & recorded ‘all the way thru’ without any sequences or samples used whatsoever, ’cause actually.. they’re really not needed.

*It’s okay 2 ‘sample your mind’, every once in a blue moon…

1 & thank U for your much appreciated interest & support of my music.

Peace.

– DāM-FunK

everybodydigs#92 Grant Green – I Want To Hold Your Hand

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The third of three sessions Grant Green co-led with modal organist Larry Young and Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones, I Want to Hold Your Hand continues in the soft, easy style of its predecessor, Street of Dreams. This time, however — as one might guess from the title and cover photo — the flavor is less reflective and more romantic and outwardly engaging. Part of the reason is tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, who takes Bobby Hutcherson’s place accompanying the core trio. His breathy, sensuous warmth keeps the album simmering at a low boil, and some of the repertoire helps as well, mixing romantic ballad standards (often associated with vocalists) and gently undulating bossa novas. The title track — yes, the Beatles tune — is one of the latter, cleverly adapted and arranged into perfectly viable jazz that suits Green’s elegant touch with pop standards; the other bossa nova, Jobim’s “Corcovado,” is given a wonderfully caressing treatment. Even with all the straightforward pop overtones of much of the material, the quartet’s playing is still very subtly advanced, both in its rhythmic interaction and the soloists’ harmonic choices. Whether augmented by an extra voice or sticking to the basic trio format, the Green/Young/Jones team produced some of the most sophisticated organ/guitar combo music ever waxed, and I Want to Hold Your Hand is the loveliest of the bunch. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#91 Miles Davis – Miles Ahead

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

These 1957 recordings were the first of Miles Davis’s collaborations with arranger Gil Evans for Columbia, renewing a relationship that had begun with the Birth of the Cool sessions in 1949. It was perhaps the most important relationship ever forged between a jazz soloist and an arranger, for Evans excelled at finding fresh material (like Delibes’s “The Maids of Cadiz”) and then adding subtle voicings and blending unusual instruments to highlight Davis’s central voice. Everything Evans does enhances the trumpeter’s keen sense of space and his evocative sound. He could construct complex arrangements and make them fly (as on the opening “Springsville,” by John Carisi), contrast Davis’s voice with tuba or bass clarinet, or create the longing, Spanish-inflected “Blues for Pablo,” a precursor to their later Sketches of Spain. –Stuart Broomer

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#90 Herbie Hancock – Maiden Voyage

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

In the mid-’60s, a distinctive postbop style evolved among the younger musicians associated with Blue Note, a new synthesis that managed to blend the cool spaciousness of Miles Davis’s modal period, some of the fire of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, and touches of the avant-garde’s group interaction. Maiden Voyage is a masterpiece of the school, with Hancock’s enduring compositions like “Maiden Voyage” and “Dolphin Dance” mingling creative tension and calm repose with strong melodies and airy, suspended harmonies that give form to his evocative sea imagery. Trumpeter Freddie Hubbard was at a creative peak, stretching his extraordinary technique to the limits in search of a Coltrane-like fluency on the heated “Eye of the Storm,” while the underrated tenor saxophonist George Coleman adds a developed lyricism to the session. –Stuart Broomer

Personnel: Herbie Hancock (piano); Herbie Hancock; Ron Carter (bass instrument); George Coleman (tenor saxophone); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); Tony Williams (drums).

Rapppamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#14

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#13: “Butterfly” by Herbie Hancock from “Thrust” released in 1974 > sampled in > “(Pimp) Strut” by Pete Rock  from “The Surviving Elements” released in 2005.

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Kwala – Lakebed EP

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Kwala released his new EP few days ago, It’s entitled “Lakebed” and essentially is a collection of very chill and relaxing tracks taken from the visual album “Cosmic Village” that he created with his friend and film maker Jacob Williams which you can watch at vimeo.com/63292771. “Lakebed EP” is available now at kwala.bandcamp.com for just 1$, go get it, enjoy!

Full listen here:

Coultrain “13th Floor (The ‘?’)”

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Coultrain released an exclusive, non-album single as a prologue to his upcoming album “Jungle Mumbo Jumbo”, it’s called “13th Floor (The ‘?’)” and you can download it for free, enjoy!

The “13th Floor” is a piece that illustrates the inevitable question that Seymour must face when returning from his Sabbatical. And because this music and poetry serves as a mirror for the universe, its a reflection of the question, though worded different ways, that we all confront, am i who i am, do i think what i think, do i love who i love, do i prefer what i prefer, because i chose or…? and then whats the solution?

DOWNLOAD! (right click and save)

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