everybodydigs#142 Horace Silver Quintet – Six Pieces Of Silver

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The Horace Silver Blue Note catalog would not be complete without Six Pieces Of Silver, a session that put the pianist on the map as a leader. After leaving the Jazz Messengers to Art Blakey, this session gave Silver a solid foothold as a solo hard bop contender, as witnessed by the ultra-funky “Senor Blues.” Though his classic quintet was a few years off, SIX PIECES features many of Silver’s Messengers cohorts including Donald Byrd, Hank Mobley, Doug Watkins, and the drummer that best suited the funky pianist, Louis Hayes.

The session gets off to a rocking start with “Cool Eyes,” a swinging testament to Silver’s writing and arranging strengths. Switching gears drastically, the somber ballad “Shirl” is one of his most introspective works. The often-covered hit “Senor Blues” is presented here in three versions: the regular album-length take, a shorter single version, and a vocal rendition by singer Bill Henderson, who was then a newcomer on the New York scene. The only standard of the set, the classic “For Heaven’s Sake,” is a touching ballad that remains a favorite of many pianists, and Silver performs it here with his usual superb taste.

Personnel: Horace Silver (piano); Bill Henderson (vocals); Hank Mobley, Junior Cook (tenor saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Doug Watkins, Gene Taylor (bass); Louis Hayes (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track.

everybodydigs#141 Donald Byrd – Mustang!

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Donald Byrd, a talented hard bop trumpeter during his prime (although rarely reaching the technical heights of Lee Morgan and Freddie Hubbard), performs a varied repertoire on Mustang!. “Dixie Lee” has dated rhythms, and “Mustang” was an attempt to achieve a hit on the level of Morgan’s “The Sidewinder.” However, Byrd sounds fine on those numbers; he digs into the complex chord changes of “Fly Little Bird Fly,” is sensitive on “I Got It Bad,” swings on his “I’m So Excited by You,” and performs his memorable countermelody to “On the Trail,” which had been recorded earlier by several other musicians. Teamed with a typically impressive Blue Note crew (altoist Sonny Red, tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley, pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Walter Booker, and drummer Freddie Waits), Byrd performs high-quality straight-ahead jazz that fits the modern mainstream of the era. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track.

sampleecious#35 Grant Green. Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#35: “Down Here On The Ground” by Grant Green from “Alive!” released in 1970 > sampled in > “Act Like You Know” by Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth from “Mecca and The Soul Brohter” released in 1992.

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