sampleecious#25

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#25: “If This World Were Mine” by Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell from “United” released in 1967 > sampled in > “Workers Comp.” by Mos Def from “The Ecstatic” released in 2009.

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Denaun Porter – Porter Chops Glasper

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Thi is a free instrumental album where producer Denaun Porter chopped and flipped the music of Robert Glasper.

Porter explains, “Long story short, I am a fan of Robert Glasper. This project contains samples of music of his from the internet, official releases, and even live performances I saw on YouTube. Porter Chops is a representation of when, I feel, the business side of things interfere too much with my creative process.”

Dope. Stream below and Download at the bottom. Enjoy!

DOWNLOAD!

Omar – The Man

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I have been waiting new Omar since  the “The Man” street video came out of nowhere in 2011 and finally, after 7 years since his last work, the new album called “The Man” is out on Freestyle Records. Everything is utterly beautiful and it also has great features like Hidden Jazz Quartett, The Scratch Professer, Caron Wheeler and Pino Palladino. “The Man” is available now at freestylerecords.kudosrecords.co.uk enjoy!

Full Stream:

Moods – Another Point Of View

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This is “Another Point Of View” the debut album by Moods released on Dutch record-label Fremdtunes. I have been following Moods since this one (Endurance) and i was curious to listen to his album which is damn good, 6 tracks with some uptempo, some hip hop,some electronic and some downtempo, overall, a surprisingly good album. Another Point Of View” is available now at fremdtunes.bandcamp.com enjoy!

Full Stream:

everybodydigs#122 John Coltrane – Soultrane

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

In addition to being bandmates within Miles Davis’ mid-’50s quintet, John Coltrane (tenor sax) and Red Garland (piano) head up a session featuring members from a concurrent version of the Red Garland Trio: Paul Chambers (bass) and Art Taylor (drums). This was the second date to feature the core of this band. A month earlier, several sides were cut that would end up on Coltrane’s Lush Life album. Soultrane offers a sampling of performance styles and settings from Coltrane and crew. As with a majority of his Prestige sessions, there is a breakneck-tempo bop cover (in this case an absolute reworking of Irving Berlin’s “Russian Lullaby”), a few smoldering ballads (such as “I Want to Talk About You” and “Theme for Ernie”), as well as a mid-tempo romp (“Good Bait”). Each of these sonic textures displays a different facet of not only the musical kinship between Coltrane and Garland but in the relationship that Coltrane has with the music. The bop-heavy solos that inform “Good Bait,” as well as the “sheets of sound” technique that was named for the fury in Coltrane’s solos on the rendition of “Russian Lullaby” found here, contain the same intensity as the more languid and considerate phrasings displayed particularly well on “I Want to Talk About You.” As time will reveal, this sort of manic contrast would become a significant attribute of Coltrane’s unpredictable performance style. Not indicative of the quality of this set is the observation that, because of the astounding Coltrane solo works that both precede and follow Soultrane — most notably Lush Life and Blue Train — the album has perhaps not been given the exclusive attention it so deserves. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#121 Sonny Rollins – Saxophone Colossus

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Though he lacked the improvisational fire of John Coltrane or the restless curiosity of Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins played with a rich, round tone that complemented his melodic inclinations, making him the most accessible of the postbop musicians. Saxophone Colossus is the most successful of the late 1950s albums that made his reputation. Rollins’s playing never falters; he’s backed by the redoubtable Max Roach on drums, Tommy Flanagan on piano, and Doug Watkins on bass. Rollins is equally at home with the lilting Caribbean air of “St. Thomas,” standards (“You Don’t Know What Love Is”), blues (“Strode Rode,” featuring a driving Flanagan solo), and a smoldering version of Brecht-Weill’s “Moritat” (better known as “Mac the Knife”). If you are new to jazz, there is no better place to start than Saxophone Colossus. –Steven Mirkin

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#24

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#24: “Games” by Dorothy Ashby from “Afro Harping” released in 1968 > sampled in > “What You Waiting For” by Pete Rock from “PeteStrumentals” released in 2001.

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