everybodydigs#132 Lou Donaldson – Midnight Creeper

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

As he delved deeper into commercial soul-jazz and jazz-funk, Lou Donaldson became better at it. While lacking the bite of his hard bop improvisations or the hard-swinging funk of Alligator Bogaloo, Midnight Creeper succeeds where its predecessor, Mr. Shing-A-Ling failed: it offers a thoroughly enjoyable set of grooving, funky soul-jazz. The five songs — including two originals by Donaldson and one each by Lonnie Smith (who also plays organ on the record), Teddy Vann, and Harold Ousley — aren’t particularly distinguished, but the vibe is important, not the material. And the band — Donaldson, Smith, trumpeter Blue Mitchell, guitarist George Benson, and drummer Leo Morris — strikes the right note, turning in a fluid, friendly collection of bluesy funk vamps. Donaldson could frequently sound stilted on his commercial soul-jazz dates, but that’s not the case with Midnight Creeper. He rarely was quite as loose on his late-’60s/early-’70s records as he is here, and that’s what makes Midnight Creeper a keeper. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#131 Kenny Drew – Undercurrent

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

A consummate pianist/composer, Kenny Drew made his first LP as a leader for Blue Note in 1953. In the ensuing years, he contributed to many great sessions including John Coltrane’s Blue Train. This 1960 quintet date with the cream of Blue Note’s stable at the time (Freddie Hubbard, Hank Mobley, Sam Jones, and Louis Hayes) represents some of his finest work as a pianist and as a writer.

Rappamlo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#30

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#30: “The Warnings (Part II)” by Davix Axelrod from “Earth Rot” released in 1970 > sampled in > “Hip Hop” by Mos Def from “The Black on Both Sides” released in 1999.

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