Colman Brothers – Colman Brothers Remixed

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The Bristol duo Colman Brothers is back with this remix project of the original album released in 2011 on Wah Wah 45s, it’s entitled “Colman Brother Remixed” and it’s full of remixes by great artists like Tall Black Guy, Scrimshire, Renegades Of Jazz, The Herbaliser and many more! Available now at colmanbrothers.bandcamp.com enjoy!

For more info check: www.wahwah45s.com

Full listen here:

DIBIA$E – 10K

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New stuff from DIBIA$E released as free download on bandcamp > mrdibiase.bandcamp.com go get it!

I know 10k likes on facebook is not a big deal too alot of cats especially when they buying likes or follows LOL, but it trips me out that this many ppl are tuned in to the music. So I wanted to drop a something showing my appreciation. thank you!!! Plus i been quiet for minute so I don’t want cats thinking i fell off the map. More dirt on the way soon

everybodydigs#79 Wayne Shorter – Etcetera

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Recorded in 1965 but not released until 1980, Et Cetera holds its own against the flurry of albums Wayne Shorter released during the mid-’60s, a time when he was at the peak of his powers. It is hard to imagine why Blue Note might have chosen to shelve the album, as it shows Shorter in a very favorable light with an incredibly responsive rhythm section performing four of his originals and a cover of Gil Evans’ “Barracudas.” The low-key nature of the album as a whole, especially the title track, might have contributed to Blue Note’s lack of attention, but there are definitely gems here, especially the closing track, “Indian Song.” At times the rest of the album seems like a warm-up for that amazing tune, where Shorter swirls around in a hypnotizing dance with Herbie Hancock’s piano, grounded by the nocturnal bass of Cecil McBee and the airy structure of Joe Chambers’ drumming. The short, repetitive themes and passionate, soulful playing echo John Coltrane, but this quartet has its own flavor, and the perfect, intricate web they weave here helps pull the whole session up to a higher level. (Stacia Proefrock)

Personnel: Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone); Herbie Hancock (piano); Cecil McBee (bass); Joe Chambers (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#78 Sarah Vaughan – Sarah Vaughan In Hi-Fi

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The title was heralding the newest technolgy, high fidelity, a sonic wonder that preceeded stereo, and Miss Vaughn was an early subject of this technoligical breakthrough. Recorded for Columbia spanning the years 1949 to 1952, this is a wonderful recording of Miss Vaughn’s. She recorded eight selections in 1950 with an octet that included trumpeter Miles Davis, trombonist Benny Green, the remarkably cool clarinetist Tony Scott and tenorman Budd Johnson. This CD adds alternate takes to seven of the numbers, increasing the discography of both Sassy and Miles. This version of “Ain’t Misbehavin’” is a true classic (with memorable eight-bar solos by each of the four horns); “Mean to Me” and “Nice Work If You Can Get It” are gems, and the other performances are not far behind. In addition, Vaughan sings two versions of “The Nearness of You” in 1949; there is also a previously unknown recording of “It’s All In the Mind,” and three orchestra numbers from 1951 and 1953 wrap up the outstanding reissue. Sassy has rarely sounded better. Highly recommended. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#77 Ornette Coleman – The Shape Of Jazz To Come

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

On this highly influential 1959 album, Ornette Coleman’s unique writing style and idiosyncratic solo language forever changed the jazz landscape. On classics such as “Lonely Woman,” “Congeniality,” and “Focus on Sanity,” Coleman used the tunes’ moods and melodic contours, rather than their chords, as a basis for his improvisations. In so doing, he opened up jazz soloing immensely and ushered in new freedoms–both individually and collectively. Lest these innovations sound too dry or abstract, it must be noted that both Coleman and trumpeter Don Cherry play with a deep-felt emotion and joy that is as infectious today as it was then. This is truly an essential jazz recording, marking the end of one era, providing the blueprint for the next. –Wally Shoup

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#9

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#9: “Brown Baby” by Diana Ross from “Touch Me In The Morning” released in 1973 > sampled in > “To You” by Guru from “Jazzmatazz Volume 2” released in 2001.

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K-Def – One Man Band

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This is “One Man Band“, K-Def’s latest endeavor on Redefinition Records. The concept of “One Man Band” is simple: giving classic records an updated feel for new audiences to enjoy and appreciate them, like “NJ Dodgers” a nice re-interpretation of “Return of the Crooklyn Dodgers” that you can stream below. Available now on Vinyl, CD & Digital at www.redefinitionrecords.com enjoy!