everybodydigs#59 Sonny Clark – Cool Struttin’

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Recorded in 1958, this legendary date with the still-undersung Sonny Clark in the leader’s chair also featured a young Jackie McLean on alto (playing with a smoother tone than he had before or ever did again), trumpeter Art Farmer, and the legendary rhythm section of bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones, both from the Miles Davis band. The set begins with one of the preeminent “swinging medium blues” pieces in jazz history: the title track with its leveraged fours and eights shoved smoothly up against the walking bass of Chambers and the backbeat shuffle of Jones. Clark’s solo, with its grouped fifths and sevenths, is a wonder of both understatement and groove, while Chambers’ arco solo turns the blues in on itself. While there isn’t a weak note on this record, there are some other tracks that stand out, most notably Miles’ “Sippin’ at Bells,” with its loping Latin rhythm. When McLean takes his solo against a handful of Clark’s shaded minor chords, he sounds as if he may blow it — he comes out a little quick — but he recovers nicely and reaches for a handful of Broadway show tunes to counter the minor mood of the piece. He shifts to both Ben Webster and Lester Young before moving through Bird, and finally to McLean himself, riding the margin of the changes to slip just outside enough to add some depth in the middle register. The LP closes with Henderson and Vallée’s “Deep Night,” the only number in the batch not rooted in the blues. It’s a classic hard bop jamming tune and features wonderful solos by Farmer, who plays weird flatted notes all over the horn against the changes, and McLean, who thinks he’s playing a kind of snake charmer blues in swing tune. This set deserves its reputation for its soul appeal alone.

Personnel: Sonny Clark (piano); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Art Farmer (trumpet); Paul Chambers (acoustic bass); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#58 The Modern Jazz Quartet – Pyramid

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

This is a strong recording from the Modern Jazz Quartet, with inventive versions of John Lewis’ “Vendome,” Ray Brown’s “Pyramid,” Jim Hall’s “Romaine,” and Lewis’ famous “Django,” along with cooking jams on “How High the Moon” and “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” The MJQ had become a jazz institution by this time, but they never lost their creative edge, and their performances (even on the remakes) are quite stimulating, enthusiastic, and fresh.

The Modern Jazz Quartet: John Lewis (piano); Milt Jackson (vibes); Percy Heath (bass); Connie Kay (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#57 Sam Rivers – Dimensions And Extensions

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Multi-instrumentalist Sam Rivers is usually identified with jazz’s avant-garde wing, but many of his albums are highly accessible thanks to his use of hard swing and his well-defined themes. Recorded in 1967,Dimensions And Extensions is one of Rivers’s finest albums ever. It features a group of simpatico musicians including trombonist Julian Priester (later to play with Herbie Hancock’s Mwandishi band), alto saxophonist James Spaulding, and hard bop (later crossover) expert trumpeter Donald Byrd. While much of this set is cerebral and sometimes challenging, Rivers engages the listener with his fervent soloing on soprano and tenor saxes and flute, as well as with his rhythmic urgency.

Personnel: Sam Rivers (flute, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); James Spaulding (flute, alto saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Julian Priester (trombone); Cecil McBee (bass instrument); Steve Ellington (drum).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#3

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#3: “Dolphin Dance” by Ahmad Jamal from “The Awakening” released in 1970 > sampled in > “Episode XXIII” by Madlib from “Madlib Medicine Show #5” released in 2010.

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Seravince – Hear To See

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Seravince‘s album entitled “Hear To See” is available worldwide now! I posted “U Love” featuring Renee Neufville back in November and i was so curious to listen to the album.

Seravince is an exciting project from keyboardist and composer Vincent Helbers (aka Flowriders) with a significant contribution of virtuoso drummer Richard Spaven (Jose James, Flying Lotus, Robert Mitchell 3io, Guru) and sensual vocals courtesy of Sharlene Hector (Basement Jaxx, Corinne Bailey Rae, Mark de Clive Lowe) and Renee Neufville (Zhane, RH Factor).

Relased on Moovmnt Records this is such a beautiful album, available now both physically and digitally on bandcamp: moovmnt.bandcamp.com enjoy!

For more info check: www.seravince.com

Full listen here: