Knxwledge – Hexual​.​Sealings​.​Pt​.​4​.​b​-​side

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Knxwledge  first release of 2013 (and everybody knows that more will come)  this is the Pt​.4 of  Hexual​.​Sealings​. series, i personally like so much the nice remix/rework/flip of D’Angelo’s “Brown Sugar” but also the others tracks are good. Hexual​.​Sealings​.​Pt​.​4​.​b​-​side is available now on bandcamp > gloof.bandcamp.com enjoy!

Full listen here:

Christoph El’ Truento – What We Used To Know

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This is “What We Used To Know” a collection of old works from the New Zeland beatmaker Christoph El’ Truento, availabe now as a name-your-price download on bandcamp > christoph-el-truento.bandcamp.com enjoy!

From 2011. An earthly journey through what we used to know // from the mind of a modern man in a dream state travelling back through the paths // knowledge // of our ancestors.

For my son // sun Rākai // Rā.

The Foreign Exchange “So What If It Is”

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This is “So What If It Is” the single from the new The Foreign Exchange‘s LP entitled “+FE Music: The Reworks” that will be released on February 26th. I don’t like this track too much because of the dance vibes but i’m looking forward to the release of the LP especially for the The Randy Watson Experience remix, it will be a 2 discs compilation with 3 brand new tracks and selections from The Foreign Exchange’s +FE Music catalog remixed by Nicolay, Zo!, 4hero, The Randy Watson Experience (?uestlove & James Poyser), Focus…, Tall Black Guy, Pirahnahead, and more.

You can stream and download “So What If It Is” down below and read the tracklist at the bottom, enjoy!

DOWNLOAD!

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Video: Secondhand Sureshots

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I have just found that dublab uploaded the complete documentary film “Secondhand Sureshots” and you can watch it for free! stream below, enjoy!

Secondhand Sureshots is a filmed experiment in creative sound recycling. Dublab Dublab directors Bryan “Morpho” Younce & Mark “frosty” McNeill sent beatmakers Daedelus, Nobody, J.Rocc and Ras G on safari into L.A. thrift stores with orders to make new music out of five finds while the cameras filmed the whole process. The result is a mini-documentary about putting new life into old vinyl.

For more info check: dublab.com/secondhand

everybodydigs#61 Cannonball Adderley – Somethin’ Else

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

When alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley culled together this quartet, he grabbed three champions from seemingly disparate schools to complement his flinty solos: Miles Davis, the king of cool; Art Blakey, the thundering force of hard bop; Hank Jones, a veteran of swing; and Sam Jones, a versatile bassist adaptable to nearly any setting. The results are one of Blue Note’s most beloved albums. The open-ended beauty of “Autumn Leaves,” which features Davis beautifully stating the melody on muted trumpet, sounds like it could easily be an outtake from Kind of Blue (which it isn’t). The midtempo title track provides the centerpiece of this classic as Adderley echoes Miles’s swaggering melody before both unravel wonderful solos. A must-have Blue Note album. –John Murph

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#60 Herbie Hancock – Empyrean Isles

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Pianist and composer Herbie Hancock has had a long and varied career, during which he’s enjoyed both creative and commercial success, though seldom at the same time. For many listeners, his creative peak came early, on two stunning Blue Note recordings, Maiden Voyage and the less celebrated Empyrean Isles. Recorded in 1964, Empyrean Isles is the earlier of the two and also the most radical. Hancock’s quartet features Freddie Hubbard substituting a cornet for his usual trumpet, and getting a more burnished, slightly warmer sound. Without the jazz-typical saxophone present, Hancock’s is almost a naked band, and the single horn blurs the lines between the pianist’s mood-rich compositions and improvisation. The group uses the increased sense of space for intense collective creation, with Hancock and drummer Tony Williams pressing far beyond their instruments’ usual roles and engaging Hubbard in edgy, complex dialogue, while bassist Ron Carter anchors the performances. Hubbard rises to the occasion with brilliance, responding to the stimulus with a fluency of thought and execution–a daring that built on his avant-garde experience with musicians like John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, and Eric Dolphy. From the breezy “Oliloqui Valley” to the funky “Cantaloupe Island” and on to the dissonance of the extended “Egg,” this is one of the most significant documents of the Blue Note style that emerged in the mid-’60s. It’s music that tests the balance of control and risk, and Hubbard’s is also one of the great performances by a trumpeter in modern jazz. –Stuart Broomer

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#59 Sonny Clark – Cool Struttin’

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Recorded in 1958, this legendary date with the still-undersung Sonny Clark in the leader’s chair also featured a young Jackie McLean on alto (playing with a smoother tone than he had before or ever did again), trumpeter Art Farmer, and the legendary rhythm section of bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones, both from the Miles Davis band. The set begins with one of the preeminent “swinging medium blues” pieces in jazz history: the title track with its leveraged fours and eights shoved smoothly up against the walking bass of Chambers and the backbeat shuffle of Jones. Clark’s solo, with its grouped fifths and sevenths, is a wonder of both understatement and groove, while Chambers’ arco solo turns the blues in on itself. While there isn’t a weak note on this record, there are some other tracks that stand out, most notably Miles’ “Sippin’ at Bells,” with its loping Latin rhythm. When McLean takes his solo against a handful of Clark’s shaded minor chords, he sounds as if he may blow it — he comes out a little quick — but he recovers nicely and reaches for a handful of Broadway show tunes to counter the minor mood of the piece. He shifts to both Ben Webster and Lester Young before moving through Bird, and finally to McLean himself, riding the margin of the changes to slip just outside enough to add some depth in the middle register. The LP closes with Henderson and Vallée’s “Deep Night,” the only number in the batch not rooted in the blues. It’s a classic hard bop jamming tune and features wonderful solos by Farmer, who plays weird flatted notes all over the horn against the changes, and McLean, who thinks he’s playing a kind of snake charmer blues in swing tune. This set deserves its reputation for its soul appeal alone.

Personnel: Sonny Clark (piano); Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Art Farmer (trumpet); Paul Chambers (acoustic bass); Philly Joe Jones (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#58 The Modern Jazz Quartet – Pyramid

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

This is a strong recording from the Modern Jazz Quartet, with inventive versions of John Lewis’ “Vendome,” Ray Brown’s “Pyramid,” Jim Hall’s “Romaine,” and Lewis’ famous “Django,” along with cooking jams on “How High the Moon” and “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” The MJQ had become a jazz institution by this time, but they never lost their creative edge, and their performances (even on the remakes) are quite stimulating, enthusiastic, and fresh.

The Modern Jazz Quartet: John Lewis (piano); Milt Jackson (vibes); Percy Heath (bass); Connie Kay (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track: