Ahnnu – World Music

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Beautiful album by Ahnnu. World Music. Love the Jazz cuts. Available now at leavingrecords.com.

“World Music introduces a series of themes which represent various styles and likenesses I’ve adopted in my growth as a sound artist living in the digital age. In respect to my environment, I wanted to create a body of sound-work that is transient in nature. Each track was arranged as separate entities and are holistic in the sense that they are intended to inspire an experience of indifference within a space of perpetual sonic motion. “World Music” describes the continuous sensory shift of both meditative neglect and cognitive sophistication when active within a (digitally) connected culture.”

Ahnnu

Stream. Download. “Shame” < right click. save. enjoy.

Full Stream > Spotify.

everybodydigs#142 Horace Silver Quintet – Six Pieces Of Silver

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The Horace Silver Blue Note catalog would not be complete without Six Pieces Of Silver, a session that put the pianist on the map as a leader. After leaving the Jazz Messengers to Art Blakey, this session gave Silver a solid foothold as a solo hard bop contender, as witnessed by the ultra-funky “Senor Blues.” Though his classic quintet was a few years off, SIX PIECES features many of Silver’s Messengers cohorts including Donald Byrd, Hank Mobley, Doug Watkins, and the drummer that best suited the funky pianist, Louis Hayes.

The session gets off to a rocking start with “Cool Eyes,” a swinging testament to Silver’s writing and arranging strengths. Switching gears drastically, the somber ballad “Shirl” is one of his most introspective works. The often-covered hit “Senor Blues” is presented here in three versions: the regular album-length take, a shorter single version, and a vocal rendition by singer Bill Henderson, who was then a newcomer on the New York scene. The only standard of the set, the classic “For Heaven’s Sake,” is a touching ballad that remains a favorite of many pianists, and Silver performs it here with his usual superb taste.

Personnel: Horace Silver (piano); Bill Henderson (vocals); Hank Mobley, Junior Cook (tenor saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Doug Watkins, Gene Taylor (bass); Louis Hayes (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track.