everybodydigs#152 The Ahmad Jamal Trio – The Awakening

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

By 1970, pianist Ahmad Jamal’s style had changed a bit since the 1950s, becoming denser and more adventurous while still retaining his musical identity. With bassist Jamil Nasser (whose double-timing lines are sometimes furious) and drummer Frank Gant, Jamal performs two originals (playing over a vamp on “Patterns”), the obscure “I Love Music,” and four jazz standards. These are intriguing performances showing that Ahmad Jamal was continuing to evolve.

Rappamelo’s favorite track.

everybodydigs#151 Thelonious Monk – The Unique Thelonious Monk

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The seven-song Unique Thelonious Monk (1956) platter was the pianist’s second during his remarkable five-year tenure on Riverside. His debut for the label was the aptly titled Plays Duke Ellington (1955) and once again, on this disc, Monk’s song selection did not feature any original compositions. Rather, the well-chosen standards included exemplify and help further establish the pianist and bandleader within the context of familiar melodies at the head of a trio — consisting of Oscar Pettiford (bass) and Art Blakey (drums). Regarding the personnel, while Pettiford had also accompanied Monk on the Ellington sides, Blakey replaces Kenny Clarke. The trio struts and glides as Monk’s intricate fingering simultaneously displays his physical dexterity as well as his ability to play so deftly in the moment. Both attributes would resurface ten-fold once Monk began to animate his own compositions on the genre-defining Brilliant Corners (1956). (allmusic)

Personnel: Thelonious Monk (piano); Oscar Pettiford (bass); Kenny Clarke, Art Blakey (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track.

sampleecious#42. Love Unlimited Orchestra. Madlib.

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks. you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below. enjoy.

#42: “Are You Sure” by Love Unlimited Orchestra from “My Sweet Summer Suite” released in 1976 > sampled in > “Sacrifice (Beat-a-holic Thoughts)” by Madlib from “Beat Konducta Vol. 5-6” released in 2008.

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