mixamelo#

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The image above is pretty clear “a mix/mixtape every monday” not by me nor rappamelo but by YOU!

I received some mix/mixtapes in the past weeks but i didn’t really know what to do because i didn’t like the idea to post them randomly into the blog so i thought to do something like sampleecious or everybodydigs but made by you.

What you need to do????  just send your mix/mixtape to > null

but please read the following “guidelines”:

– Please use “mixamelo submission” as subject of the email.
– Please provide an “embedded player” like Sound Cloud, Mixcloud or similar.
– Please provide some infos about you, i mean: what’s your name, where are you from etc…
– Please write few words about your mix/mixtape.

Don’t worry, even if you do not follow any of the above guidelines i will consider your email but please do.

ps. if you have already sent your mix/mixtape in the past (even yesterday) send it again!

everybodydigs#82 Jackie McLean – Demon’s Dance

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

The late alto saxophonist Jackie McLean had one of the most distinctive sounds in jazz history–fluid and bittersweet, with an impassioned “cry” at its heart. McLean made several classic albums for Blue Note in the 1960s, with Demon’s Dance arriving in 1967, near the end of his time with the label. While not as well known as his other albums, Dance exhibits some excellent bristling, surging hard bop, much of which features trumpeter Woody Shaw–most notably on the indelible, infectious would-be hit “Sweet Love of Mine.”

Personnel: Jackie McLean (alto saxophone); Jackie McLean; Scott Holt (bass instrument); Woody Shaw (trumpet); LaMont Johnson (piano); Jack DeJohnette (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#81 Quincy Jones – You’ve Got It Bad Girl

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Quincy Jones followed up Smackwater Jack and his supervision of Donny Hathaway’s Come Back Charleston Blue soundtrack with this, a mixed bag that saw him inching a little closer toward the R&B-dominated approach that reached full stride on the following Body Heat and peaked commercially with The Dude. That said, the album’s most notorious cut is “The Streetbeater” — better known as the Sanford & Son theme, a novelty for most but also one of the greasiest, grimiest instrumental fusions of jazz and funk ever laid down — while its second most noteworthy component is a drastic recasting of “Summer in the City,” as heard in the Pharcyde’s “Passin’ Me By,” where the frantic, bug-eyed energy of the Lovin’ Spoonful original is turned into a magnetically lazy drift driven by Eddie Louis’ organ, Dave Grusin’s electric piano, and Valerie Simpson’s voice. (Simpson gives the song a “Summertime”-like treatment.) Between that, the title song (a faithfully mellow version, with Jones’ limited but subdued vocal lead), a medley of Aretha Franklin’s “Daydreaming” and Ewan MacColl’s “First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” and a light instrumental, roughly half the album is mood music, and it’s offset with not just “The Streetbeater” but a large-scale take on “Manteca,” a spooky-then-overstuffed “Superstition” (where the uncredited Billy Preston, Bill Withers, and Stevie Wonder are billed as “three beautiful brothers”), and the “Streetbeater” companion “Chump Change” (co-written with Bill Cosby). The best here can be had on comps, but the album is by no means disposable.

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#80 Ohio Players – Fire

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

After greatly increasing their visibility with Skin Tight, the Ohio Players became even more visible with Fire — an unpredictable masterpiece that boasted such explosive horn-driven funk jewels as “Smoke” and the wildly addictive title song. The Players were always best known for their hard-edged funk, but in fact, there was much more to their legacy. “I Want to Be Free,” the almost innocent “Together,” and the remorseful “It’s All Over” demonstrate that their ballads and slower material could be first-rate soul treasures. The influence of gospel imagery and the black church experience had asserted itself on Skin Tight’s “Is Anybody Gonna Be Saved,” and does so once again on the intense “What the Hell” and the hit “Runnin’ From the Devil.” Without question, Fire was one of the Ohio Players’ greatest triumphs — both commercially and artistically. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#10

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#10: “One Hunded Ways” by Quincy Jones from “The Dude” released in 1981 > sampled in > “Rhymes Like Dimes” by MF Doom from “Operation: Doomsday” released in 1999.

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