everybodydigs#35 Hubert Laws – Morning Star

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Flutist Hubert Laws is joined by a large string orchestra on this set, which was arranged and conducted by Don Sebesky. Keyboardist Bob James is in the supporting cast, and some unnecessary background vocalists (including Debra and Eloise Laws) are employed on some of the numbers, but the focus is mostly on Laws’ brilliant and appealing flute. Highlights include “Let Her Go,” “Where Is the Love,” and, particularly, “Amazing Grace.” The results are pleasing, if not quite essential.

Personnel: Hubert Laws (flute, alto flute, piccolo); Debra Laws, Eloise Laws, Lani Groves, Tasha Thomas (vocals); John Tropea (guitar); Gloria Agostini (harp); Elliot Rosoff, David Nadien, Gene Orloff, Irving Spice, Harry Cykman, Max Ellen, Paul Gershman, Emanuel Green, Harry Lookofsky (violin); Lucien Schmit, George Koutzen, Charles McCracken (cello); Romeo Penque (flute, alto flute, piccolo, English horn); Phil Bodner (flute, alto flute, clarinet); Jack Knitzer (bassoon); Alan Rubin, Marvin Stamm (trumpet, flugelhorn); James Buffington (French horn); Garnett Brown (trombone); Bob James (electric piano); Dave Friedman (vibraphone, percussion); Billy Cobham (drums); Ralph MacDonald (percussion)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#34 Chet Baker & Art Pepper – Playboys

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

These Halloween 1956 sides originally appeared as Playboys in 1961 on Pacific Jazz. Myth and rumor persist that, under legal advice from the publisher of a similarly named magazine, the collection would have to be retitled. When the CD version of the same material was issued in the early ’90s, it had been accurately christened Picture of Heath — as more than half of the tracks are Jimmy Heath compositions. Since then, a CD version sporting the original provocative ’50s pinup cover and the name Playboys has also surfaced. Regardless of title, however, the music is the absolute same. These are the third sessions to feature the dynamic duo of Art Pepper (alto sax) and Chet Baker (trumpet). Their other two meetings had produced unequivocal successes. The first was during a brief July 1956 session at the Forum Theater in L.A. Baker joined forces with Pepper’s sextet, ultimately netting material for the disc Route. Exactly three months to the day later, Pepper and Baker reconvened to record tracks for the Chet Baker Big Band album. The quartet supporting Baker and Pepper on Playboys includes Curtis Counce (bass), Phil Urso (tenor sax), Carl Perkins (piano), and Larance Marable (drums). Baker and Pepper have an instinctual rapport that yields outstanding interplay. The harmony constant throughout the practically inseparable lines that Baker weaves with Pepper drives the bop throughout the slinky “For Minors Only.” The soloists take subtle cues directly off each other, with considerable contributions from Perkins, Counce, and Marable. With the notorious track record both Baker and Pepper had regarding other decidedly less successful duets, it is unfortunate that more recordings do not exist that captured their special bond. These thoroughly enjoyable and often high-energy sides are perfect for bop connoisseurs as well as mainstream jazz listeners.

Personnel: Chet Baker (trumpet); Art Pepper (alto saxophone); Phil Urso (tenor saxophone); Carl Perkins (piano); Larance Marable (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#33 Ennio Morricone – Le Foto Proibite Di Una Signora Per Bene

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Ennio Morricone composed hundreds of original soundtracks for this style of low-budget thriller. The original soundtrack for this obscure Italian thriller from 1970 prominently features the voice of Edda Dell’Orso, who cropped up frequently in Morricone’s work during this period. Additionally, the Canori Moderni vocal ensemble features heavily in the evocative soundtrack. Most striking is the manner in which the composer uses repetition in an almost minimalist fashion. The unusual orchestrations of his work, which would later become a signature of his soundtrack compositions, are strikingly evident here. ~ Skip Jansen.

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

K-Def – The Breaks (Mixtape)

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Great break mixtape from K-Def, enjoy!

BIG UP to DJ K-Def for making and sharing this GREAT break mix with us!

K has a whole bunch of great records of his own dropping throughout 2013 on Redef and SOS, including instrumental albums as well as collabs with MCs such as Blu, Raw Poetic, Quartermaine, El Da Sensei and more.

Hit K-Def on Soundcloud: @www.soundcloud.com/djkdef
and on Twitter: www.twitter.com/djkdef

Video: Slum Village/J Dilla/The Roots (Okayplayer Tour 2000)

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I was surfing on youtube trying to find some footages of the recent Okayplayer Holiday Jam and i came across these such incredible videos recorded during the Okayplayer Tour 2000. The first one is a short video that features Dilla performing with Slum Village and The Roots, the second one features Slum Village performing “Raise It Up” with The Roots and the last one features Slum Village performing “Conant Gardens”, “Fall in Love” and “Climax” with The Roots.

video below, play and enjoy!

Shafiq Husayn – Pre-Alignment, Vol. 1: A Prelude To The L∞P

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Producer/Master Teacher, Shafiq Husayn, (1/3rd of SA-RA Creative Partners and producer for the likes of Erykah Badu, Bilal, Blu, & many more) teamed up with FRSH SLCTS (http://FRESHselects.net) to debut the first in a new series of mixes – dubbed Pre-Alignment, which Shafiq has put together as a prelude leading up to his highly-anticipated sophomore release, The L∞P.

Pre-Alignment, Vol. 1: Beatstrumentals & Dialog is a 26 minute mix featuring all new, unreleased beats and never before heard collaborations w/ the likes of Krondon (Strong Arm Steady), J Mitchell, Breezy Lovejoy and D-Prosper.

DOWNLOAD!

everybodydigs#32 Miles Davis – Kind Of Blue

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Kind of Blue isn’t merely an artistic highlight for Miles Davis, it’s an album that towers above its peers, a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence. Why does Kind of Blue posses such a mystique? Perhaps because this music never flaunts its genius. It lures listeners in with the slow, luxurious bassline and gentle piano chords of “So What.” From that moment on, the record never really changes pace — each tune has a similar relaxed feel, as the music flows easily. Yet Kind of Blue is more than easy listening. It’s the pinnacle of modal jazz — tonality and solos build from the overall key, not chord changes, giving the music a subtly shifting quality. All of this doesn’t quite explain why seasoned jazz fans return to this record even after they’ve memorized every nuance. They return because this is an exceptional band — Miles, Coltrane, Bill Evans, Cannonball Adderley, Paul Chambers, Jimmy Cobb — one of the greatest in history, playing at the peak of its power. As Evans said in the original liner notes for the record, the band did not play through any of these pieces prior to recording. Davis laid out the themes before the tape rolled, and then the band improvised. The end results were wondrous and still crackle with vitality. Kind of Blue works on many different levels. It can be played as background music, yet it amply rewards close listening. It is advanced music that is extraordinarily enjoyable. It may be a stretch to say that if you don’t like Kind of Blue, you don’t like jazz — but it’s hard to imagine it as anything other than a cornerstone of any jazz collection.

Personnel: Miles Davis (trumpet); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Bill Evans, Wynton Kelly (piano); Cannonball Adderley (alto saxophone); Paul Chambers (bass); Jimmy Cobb (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#31 Duke Ellington & John Coltrane – Duke Ellington & John Coltrane

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

For this classic encounter, Duke Ellington “sat in” with the John Coltrane Quartet for a set dominated by Ellington’s songs; some performances have his usual sidemen (bassist Aaron Bell and drummer Sam Woodyard) replacing Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones in the group. Although it would have been preferable to hear Coltrane play in the Duke Ellington orchestra instead of the other way around, the results are quite rewarding. Their version of “In a Sentimental Mood” is a high point, and such numbers as “Take the Coltrane,” “Big Nick,” and “My Little Brown Book” are quite memorable. Ellington always recognized talent, and Coltrane seemed quite happy to be recording with a fellow genius. (allmusic)

Personnel: Duke Ellington (piano); John Coltrane (soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone); Aaron Bell, Jimmy Garrison (bass); Elvin Jones, Sam Woodyard (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#30 George Duke – The Aura Will Prevail

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

In 1975, George Duke was dabbling in R&B vocals. But instrumental jazz-fusion was still his primary focus, and he had yet to be played extensively on any of the genres’ stations. When The Aura Will Prevail came out that year, no one bought the LP for its occasional R&B vocal — the main attraction was Duke’s keyboard playing. “Fools” is a melancholy soul ballad that finds him singing lead and predicts what was to come on R&B-oriented releases like Don’t Let Go (1978) and Master of the Game (1979), but it isn’t typical of the album on the whole. This is a fusion effort first and foremost, and Duke has plenty of room to stretch out and improvise on instrumentals that range from the insistent “Floop de Loop” to the Brazilian-influenced “Malibu” (which shouldn’t be confused with the Hole/Courtney Love gem). Two of the songs were written or co-written by Frank Zappa: the fusion instrumental “Echidna’s Arf” and the gospel-minded soul item “Uncle Remus” (another tune that gives Duke a chance to sing lead). Without question, The Aura Will Prevail is among this artist’s finest fusion-oriented albums. (allmusic.com)

Personnel: George Duke (keboards, vocals); Alphonso Johnson (bass); Leon “Ndugu” Chancler (durms); Airto Moreira (percussion); Sylvia Saint James (vocals); Kathy Woehrle (vocals).

Rappamelo’s favorite track: