KNX “Hai[$100Nytemayrs]”

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This is “Hai[$100Nytemayrs]” a track taken form “Anthology”, 53 tracks anthology taken from the over 9000 Knx Bandcamp releases . “Anthology” will be released June 11th on digital and on cassette via Leaving Records & Stones Throw Records.

Stream & Download “Hai[$100Nytemayrs]” down below, enjoy!

Download MP3: Knx – Hai[$100Nytemayrs]  (right click and save)

Thundercat – Apocalypse

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The new album by the Los Angeles’ bassist/songwriter/vocalist Stephen Bruner aka Thundercat called “Apocalypse” is finally out on Brainfeeder. I’m gonna say just few words about it: This album is fucking beautiful. Stop. Apocalype is available now at brainfeedersite.com and you can stream in in in its entirety at www.npr.org enjoy.

Listen to “Heartbreaks + Setbacks”.

mixamelo#10 DJ Mace “Tape This Beat”

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mixamelo# “a mix/mixtape every monday”: This Monday by Rogier van Hout a.k.a. DJ Mace and co-running indie-label Fremdtunes from The Netherlands. It’s called “Tape This Beat” and it’s all about: Chaos, associative, dust, glitches, noise, beats, cut, breaks, paste, jazz, funk, dirt, spoken word and Music! You can stream & download the mix down below, enjoy!

DOWNLOAD!

submit yours here > rappamelo.com

everybodydigs#115 Aretha Franklin – I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

While the inclusion of “Respect” — one of the truly seminal singles in pop history — is in and of itself sufficient to earn I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You classic status, Aretha Franklin’s Atlantic label debut is an indisputable masterpiece from start to finish. Much of the credit is due to producer Jerry Wexler, who finally unleashed the soulful intensity so long kept under wraps during her Columbia tenure; assembling a crack Muscle Shoals backing band along with an abundance of impeccable material, Wexler creates the ideal setting to allow Aretha to ascend to the throne of Queen of Soul, and she responds with the strongest performances of her career. While the brilliant title track remains the album’s other best-known song, each cut on I Never Loved a Man is touched by greatness; covers of Ray Charles’ “Drown in My Own Tears” and Sam Cooke’s “Good Times” and “A Change Is Gonna Come” are on par with the original recordings, while Aretha’s own contributions — “Don’t Let Me Lose This Dream,” “Baby, Baby, Baby,” “Save Me,” and “Dr. Feelgood (Love Is a Serious Business)” — are perfectly at home in such lofty company. A soul landmark. (allmusic)

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#114 Kenny Burrell – Midnight Blue

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Kenny Burrell’s music is a wonderful blend of elegance and conviction, musical inventiveness and thoughtful restraint. On this 1967 session, the guitarist is joined by regular associates–tenorist Stanley Turrentine, conga drummer Ray Barretto, bassist Major Holley, and drummer Bill English–and together they concentrate on the subtlest and deepest hues of the blues, combining strong rhythmic grooves with a feeling of late-night reflection. There’s never a misstep or a superfluous note, from the funky Latin hit “Chitlins Con Carne” to Burrell’s deeply felt solo “Soul Lament” and the concentrated swing of “Gee, Baby, Ain’t I Good to You.”

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#113 Bobbi Humphrey – Blacks And Blues

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Bobbi Humphrey scored her biggest hit with her third album Blacks and Blues, an utterly delightful jazz-funk classic that helped make her a sensation at Montreux. If it sounds a lot like Donald Byrd’s post-Black Byrd output, it’s no accident; brothers Larry and Fonce Mizell have their fingerprints all over the album, and as on their work with Byrd, Larry handles all the composing and most of the arranging and production duties. It certainly helps that the Mizells were hitting on all cylinders at this point in their careers, but Humphrey is the true star of the show; she actually grabs a good deal more solo space than Byrd did on his Mizell collaborations, and she claims a good deal of responsibility for the album’s light, airy charm. Her playing is indebted to Herbie Mann and, especially, Hubert Laws, but she has a more exclusive affinity for R&B and pop than even those two fusion-minded players, which is why she excels in this setting. Mizell is at the peak of his arranging powers, constructing dense grooves with lots of vintage synths, wah-wah guitars, and rhythmic interplay. Whether the funk runs hot or cool, Humphrey floats over the top with a near-inexhaustible supply of melodic ideas. She also makes her vocal debut on the album’s two ballads, “Just a Love Child” and “Baby’s Gone”; her voice is girlish but stronger than the genre standard, even the backing vocals by the Mizells and keyboardist Fred Perren. Overall, the album’s cumulative effect is like a soft summer breeze, perfect for beaches, barbecues, and cruising with the top down. (allmusic.com)

Peronnel: Bobbi Humphrey (flute, vocals); Chuck Rainey, Ron Brown (bass); Fonce Mizell (clavinet, trumpet, backing vocals); King Erison (congas); Harvey Mason (drums); Jerry Peters (electric piano); David T. Walker, John Rowin (guitar); Stephanie Spruill (percussion); Fred Perren (synthesizer, backing vocals); Larry Mizel (backing vocals).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#112 Donald Byrd – Black Byrd

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Purists howled with indignation when Donald Byrd released Black Byrd, a full-fledged foray into R&B that erupted into a popular phenomenon. Byrd was branded a sellout and a traitor to his hard bop credentials, especially after Black Byrd became the biggest-selling album in Blue Note history. What the elitists missed, though, was that Black Byrd was the moment when Byrd’s brand of fusion finally stepped out from under the shadow of his chief influence, Miles Davis, and found a distinctive voice of its own. Never before had a jazz musician embraced the celebratory sound and style of contemporary funk as fully as Byrd did here — not even Davis, whose dark, chaotic jungle-funk stood in sharp contrast to the bright, breezy, danceable music on Black Byrd. Byrd gives free rein to producer/arranger/composer Larry Mizell, who crafts a series of tightly focused, melodic pieces often indebted to the lengthier orchestrations of Isaac Hayes and Curtis Mayfield. They’re built on the most straightforward funk rhythms Byrd had yet tackled, and if the structures aren’t as loose or complex as his earlier fusion material, they make up for it with a funky sense of groove that’s damn near irresistible. Byrd’s solos are mostly melodic and in-the-pocket, but that allows the funk to take center stage. Sure, maybe the electric piano, sound effects, and Roger Glenn’s ubiquitous flute date the music somewhat, but that’s really part of its charm. Black Byrd was state-of-the-art for its time, and it set a new standard for all future jazz/R&B/funk fusions — of which there were many. Byrd would continue to refine this sound on equally essential albums like Street Lady and the fantastic Places and Spaces, but Black Byrd stands as his groundbreaking signature statement. (allmusic.com)

Personnel: Donald Byrd (vocals, trumpet, electric trumpet, flugelhorn); Fonce Mizell (vocals, trumpet); Freddie Perren (vocals, electric piano, synthesizer); Larry Mizell (vocals); David T. Walker, Dean Parks, Barney Perry (guitar); Allan Curtis Barnes (flute, oboe, saxophone); Roger Glenn (flute, saxophone); Joe Sample (piano, electric piano); Kevin Toney (piano); Chuck Rainey, Wilton Felder (electric bass); Harvey Mason, Sr. , Keith Killgo (drums); Perk Jacobs, Stephanie Spruill, Bobbye Hall, Bobbye Porter (percussion).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

sampleecious#21

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sampleecious#: a post every Friday where i choose just one great track sampled for one or more other great tracks, also you can listen to (when it’s possible) a small preview on the video below, enjoy!

#21: “Joshua” by Miles Davis from “Seven Steps To Heaven” released in 1963 > sampled in > “Horn In The Middle” by Nujabes from “Metaphorical Music” released in 2003.

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