Benny Tones – Chrysalis The Remixes

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I’ve quite enjoyed “Chrysalis” when it was released back in 2010, then internationally released by BBE Records in 2011, it was such a beautiful album by Benny Tones (official Sound Tech for future soul band Electric Wire Hustle). Now it’s time for “Chrysalis – The Remixes”  a collection of 30 remixes from the freshest producer talents across the globe including, fLako (England), Opiuo (Melbourne), B.Bravo (San Francisco), AD Bourke (Rome), Tayreeb (Paris), Comfort Fit (Berlin) and New Zealand’s own, TRUTH, Alphabethead, Sola Rosa and Christoph El Truento to name a few.

“It has been a real journey collating so many crazy remixes from people I have met all around the world. I ended up with so many I loved I couldn’t decide which ones to include, so I thought I would just do one huge release of 30 remixes! It’s an incredible collection of music, from so many different genre’s and styles and I am so happy to finally be able to release it into the world.” says Benny.

Out now on BBE Records, enjoy!

Stream of “On My Way” remixed by fLako:

DâM-FunK “Tranquil Funk”

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Selections from the 1994 private press DāM-FunK cassette tape called “Tranquil Funk”, ‘limited time’ free download, enjoy!

*Warning: Contains Explicit Language*

Recorded in 1994 in my bedroom, this is: “Tranquil Funk”; which was a 16 track cassette tape only given out 2 close friends & associates in my Pasadena, Ca. neighborhood, without any intentions of getting a ‘record deal’ or any of the sort. I was just doing what I love: Music.

At this time in my life I was very young in the mind (via the ‘immature use’ of the ‘N’ word, in ‘some’ of these tracks & a word I NEVER will use in ‘my own personal music’ ever again), yet musically advanced amongst my peers. This ‘limited time only’ FREE DOWNLOAD is a snapshot in time, in relation 2 my story & origins within this music game.
*Thanx for your interest & giving this era of my music output some ear time.

Selections in order:

1. KDGR Dj announcement
2. Satisfaction
3. L.A. Ride
4. I Know What’z On Your Mind
5. Conversation 2/ Hood Shouts
6. It’s Only U (Feat. Suzanne on demo vocals)
7. Tranquility
8. Outro

Running time: 24:00

Peace.

*All production, instruments, vocals, recording & music by: DāM-FunK (except vocals on “It’s Only U” by Suzanne)

[Special thanx 2: Peanut Butter Wolf for pulling me up out of obscurity, at the correct time. Big love]

**DON’T GIVE UP!!
-DāM-FunK

everybodydigs#52 Charlie Parker & Dizzy Gillespie – Bird And Diz

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

This date from June 6, 1950, was an unusual one for Charlie Parker. He chose to play with fellow bop creators Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, in a striking reunion with the trumpeter and the only occasion on which Parker recorded with the pianist. Though the three may have felt encumbered by the presence of swing drummer Buddy Rich, they’re in brilliant form, with Parker and Gillespie spurring one another to heights that range from the warm to the electric. Bird’s ideas flow with characteristic ease and swing while Gillespie sparks and flares. It’s unlikely that anyone else but Gillespie could match Parker on the dazzling interplay of “Leap Frog,” a performance supplemented by several alternate takes. Monk’s characteristically skewed solos are a rare delight in what is otherwise an orthodox bop setting. The tunes are all Parker’s except for “My Melancholy Baby,” which inspires witty play. –Stuart Broomer

Personnel: Charlie Parker (alto saxophone); Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet); Thelonious Monk (piano); Curly Russsell (bass); Buddy Rich (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#51 Bobby Hutcherson – Components

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Perhaps the single album that best sums up Bobby Hutcherson’s early musical personality, Components is appropriately split into two very distinct halves. The first features four Hutcherson originals in a melodic but still advanced hard bop style, while the latter half has four free-leaning avant-garde pieces by drummer Joe Chambers. Hutcherson allots himself more solo space than on Dialogue, but that’s no knock on the excellent supporting cast, which includes Herbie Hancock on piano, James Spaulding on alto sax and flute, Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, and Ron Carter on bass. It’s just more Hutcherson’s date, and he helps unite the disparate halves with a cool-toned control that’s apparent regardless of whether the material is way outside or more conventionally swinging. In the latter case, Hutcherson’s originals are fairly diverse, encompassing rhythmically complex hard bop (the title track), pensive balladry (“Tranquillity,” which features a lovely solo by Hancock), down-and-dirty swing (“West 22nd Street Theme”), and the gaily innocent “Little B’s Poem,” which went on to become one of Hutcherson’s signature tunes and contains some lyrical flute work from Spaulding. The Chambers pieces tend to be deliberate explorations that emphasize texture and group interaction in the manner of Dialogue, except that there’s even more freedom in terms of both structure and tonal center. (The exception is the brief but beautiful closing number, “Pastoral,” an accurate title if ever there was one.) Components illustrated that Hutcherson was not only the most adventurous vibes player on the scene, but that he was also capable of playing more straightforward music with intelligence and feeling. by Steve Huey

Personnel: Bobby Hutcherson (vibraphone, marimba); Herbie Hancoc (piano); Ron Carter (bass); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet); James Spaulding (alto saxophone, flute); Joe Chambers (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track:

everybodydigs#50 Dexter Gordon – Go

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everybodydigs# is a series of posts about Jazz, Funk, Soul & R’n’b albums released from the 20s to the 90s, you can read a brief description/review and listen to a small preview (when it’s possible). everybodydigs# is like when someone tells you “hey you should listen to this album!” and nothing less, enjoy!

Just before heading off to a 15-year stay in Europe, the stately Dexter Gordon waxed a pair of records for Blue Note in August 1962: this classic and, two days later, A Swingin’ Affair. It’s been widely reported that Gordon himself considered Go! his greatest achievement, and (if so) it’s easy to hear why. Brimming with conviction and poise, Gordon’s gentle-giant sax carries itself with a sort of graceful edge that is difficult to emulate. He’s always quick with a humorous quote, yet it always seems to fit just right. He’s always languishing behind the beat, yet he never seems late. He possesses an enormous tone, yet he never overwhelms the songs or the listener. He sounds unhurried at any speed. His song selection is typically creative, holding little-known ballads close to his brawny chest like a big, cuddly bear. A stellar rhythm section of the elegantly funky pianist Sonny Clark plus Butch Warren and Billy Higgins doesn’t hurt either. –Marc Greilsamer

Personnel: Dexter Gordon (tenor saxophone); Sonny Clark (piano); Butch Warren (bass); Billy Higgins (drums).

Rappamelo’s favorite track: